Wilton Manors Townhome for Sale: 2269 NE 9th Ave # 2269 $410,000

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Unparalleled Elegance describes this stunning Belle Isle Townhome. The finest property on the market in Wilton Manors at this price and located just steps from Wilton Drive. This three-story masterpiece boasts exceptional finishes and designer touches throughout! Open concept floor plan includes Formal Dining Room, and Guest Bathroom. This room is also considered a bedroom; ceramic and carpeted flooring throughout, recessed lighting and a terrace. Upper level offers 2 Master Bedroom Suites, 2 Bathrooms, plus Laundry. Bonus: Hurricane Impact windows and 2 car garage. Please review Bylaws…Rental Restriction Cap 25% or 15 units. See attached documents. Features: 3 bedrooms 3 full bathrooms Den 2 car garage 1945 sq. ft.

Advertisements

U.S. housing starts climbed 18.6% in Jan.

WASHINGTON (AP) – March 8, 2019 – U.S. housing starts jumped 18.6 percent in January, as builders ramped up construction of single-family houses to the fastest pace in eight months.

The Commerce Department said Friday that January ground breakings occurred at a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 1.23 million. Home construction rebounded sharply from December, when the annual rate was just 1.04 million.

Most of the new construction came from single-family houses, which were being built at the strongest rate since May 2018. Still, overall housing starts in January were slightly below the 2018 total of 1.24 million as the pace of apartment construction slowed.

The housing market was hurt for much of 2018 by rising mortgage rates, which made it costlier to purchase a home. But average rates have declined since early November and the average 30-year rate was 4.41 percent this week, providing a possible boost for home buying this year.

Permits for construction, an indicator of future activity, improved 1.4 percent to a seasonally adjusted rate of 1.35 million. The permits suggest additional apartment construction in the coming months, as that segmented accounted for the gains. Single-family permits fell 2.1 percent in January to an annual rate of 812,000.

Parkland Golf and Country Club For Sale

Parkland Golf and Country Club For Sale

Beautiful 5 bedroom home in sought after Parkland Golf and Country Club. A resort like community with a clubhouse, fitness center, restaurant, tennis, golf, and spa. Home is located within the county’s best public schools, within driving distance to shopping centers and within walking distance to places of worship.


Make and Offer!

Globally, the U.S. is a deal in luxury housing

CHICAGO – June 14, 2017 – Luxury real estate buyers may find bargains in the U.S. compared to the rest of the world. The U.S. is hardly the most expensive when it comes to home prices in its luxury market.

Instead, China takes the world crown in that arena for the fastest-rising prices in luxury residential real estate around the world. Luxury home prices in Guangzhou, the capital of the southern province of Guangdong, rose a whopping 36.2 percent from March 2016 to March 2017, according to Knight Frank’s first-quarter Prime Global Cities Index, which ranks the top 5 percent of luxury real estate sales in 41 large international cities.

Meanwhile, the U.S.’s single-digit increases in that time period may seem more modest in comparison.

The top three global cities to land on the list are Guangzhou, up 36.2 percent; Beijing, where luxury home prices rose 22.9 percent; and Toronto, prices up 22.2 percent.

The U.S. cities landing on the Prime Global Cities Index include Miami (at number 14 on the list with a 4.1 percent year-over-year price increase), Los Angeles (prices up 2.5%), San Francisco (prices up 1.8%), and New York (prices up 1.7%).

“We’re seeing steady and sustainable luxury price growth in the key U.S. markets,” says Kate Everett-Allen, head of international residential research at Knight Frank. However, the cost of buying luxury homes isn’t rising quite as quickly in the U.S. as some other parts of the world because “there are a lot of major changes taking place both politically and internationally.”

Source: “The New Hot Spots for Luxury Real Estate Around the World,” realtor.com® (May 8, 2017)

© Copyright 2017 INFORMATION, INC. Bethesda, MD (301) 215-4688

Is a $399K list price really better than $400K?

NEW YORK – June 19, 2017 – Why did my doughnut cost 99 cents this morning instead of a simple, even dollar? It turns out that the price has less to do with cost or value and more to do with how our brains process numbers.

Our brains are good at some things but not others. We are terrible at crunching numbers, for example.

But we excel at quickly processing our environment – for instance, if we see a long object moving on the ground, we don’t calculate its trajectory and motion. Instead, we just run – better to take the risk of embarrassment (a twig on the ground) than risk being bitten by a snake.

To do this, our brains need to take in a relatively small amount of information and make up the rest using previous experience, expectations, and predictions.

Your brain is a cheater

The brain cheats, taking shortcuts and making snap judgments instead of carefully deliberating the facts. Most of the time, this is a good thing, because shortcuts are efficient and usually get you to the same place as the long way.

All business owners should consider experimenting with prices. Thanks to brain science, we now know that even a one-cent change can make a big difference.

Consider using a number that the human brain is likely to round down to make your product appear to be a better value. As a consumer, just becoming aware of your brain’s shortcuts can make you a more careful buyer.

Numbers are an easy place for the brain to take a shortcut. We tend to be great at making estimations but horrible at rounding. When our brains see a price tag with lots of numbers, they automatically estimate, so $4.99 ends up closer to $4 than $5; $66,999 becomes $66,000 or sometimes even $60,000. Psychologists have known this for decades, and economists now begrudgingly admit it as well.

Psychological factors

Businesses have used pricing tricks for years to their advantage. They figured out by experimentation that tiny differences in pricing can make big differences in sales, and researchers studied this effect in depth in the 1990s and early 2000s.

They found that there is often a big sales difference between $2.99 and $3, but dropping a product’s price from $2.24 to $2.23 does not yield a measurable increase in sales. A penny is not always worth a penny.

Of course, there are other psychological factors at work in pricing. Relative pricing plays an important role: A product’s price compared to the products physically surrounding it can impact its sales. That is why gas stations not only charge per gallon to the nine-tenths of a cent but also price match to the competitor across the street. The human brain is especially good at making either/or comparisons and especially bad at decimals.

How shoppers can prevail

This strategy applies to shoppers as well. If you’re buying a 99-cent doughnut, think $1. A penny probably won’t break your budget, but rounding bias becomes more important for a larger purchase.

A $399,000 house is pretty much $400,000, but not in your mind: your brain’s shortcut system will try to suggest it’s closer to $300,000.

When the stakes are that high, don’t just think about it. Remember, our brains are better at thinking than “we” are and will continue to trick us!

To combat this, physically write down the price on a piece of paper, strike through it, and re-write the appropriate number by rounding up. The best defense is always a strong offense.

Copyright © 2017, USATODAY.com, USA TODAY. Jeff Stibel is vice chairman of Dun & Bradstreet, a partner of Bryant Stibel and an entrepreneur who also happens to be a brain scientist. He is the USA TODAY bestselling author of “Breakpoint” and “Wired for Thought.”

12M consumers may get July credit-score boost

 

WASHINGTON – June 22, 2017 – The three largest credit-reporting agencies will begin cleaning up credit reports in July, which could help lift the credit scores of about 12 million consumers.

In a survey by the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), one in four people say they spot errors in their credit reports, most commonly concerning tax liens and civil judgments.

Up to half of tax lien data on a credit report is inaccurate or incomplete, says Eric J. Ellman, senior vice president for public policy and legal affairs at the Consumer Data Industry Association. Civil judgments – which means a court has ruled a person owes money – also tend to be ripe with errors or omissions on a credit report, experts say. Consumers can dispute the errors, but the process can be cumbersome.

Beginning July 1, Equifax, Experian and TransUnion will automatically exclude tax lien and civil judgment records from credit reports if they are missing a person’s name, address, Social Security number or date of birth. Claims that do contain this key information, however, will remain on credit reports.

Six percent of Americans with a credit score – or 12 million – likely will see their score go up once the new policy takes effect. About 11 million could see an increase of about 20 points.

“A lot of people who have liens or judgments against them already have crummy credit to begin with,” says Keith Gumbinger, vice president at HSH.com, a mortgage resource website. “A 10- or 20-point increase isn’t going to make a difference for a lot of borrowers.”

But borrowers who are on the cusp of qualifying for a home loan may stand to benefit the most. For example, Gumbinger says, a would-be buyer with a credit score of 570 who receives a 10-point uptick may be able to qualify for an FHA loan. FHA loans require a minimum 580 credit score.

Source: “Have a Bad Credit Score? It Could Soon Get Better – But Is It Enough to Buy a Home?” realtor.com® (June 22, 2017)

© Copyright 2017 INFORMATION INC., Bethesda, MD (301) 215-4688

Affordable housing: Americans want help getting in

WASHINGTON – June 22, 2017 – Most Americans and Canadians say their nations aren’t doing enough to address and solve affordable housing needs, according to Habitat for Humanity’s Affordable Housing Survey. Escalating costs remain a top barrier preventing families from accessing decent homes with affordable mortgages, the survey says.

“In many ways, housing is an invisible crisis,” says Jonathan Reckford, CEO of Habitat for Humanity International. “There are still too many families without access to safe, secure and affordable housing. This survey highlights the value all of us place on a decent place to call home and underscores the critical need to increase access to affordable housing.”

Owning a home is a key rung on the ladder of economic advancement. What happens if that rung remains elusive for many?

According to the survey, nine out of 10 Americans say owning a home is one of their greatest achievements in life. Also, 68 percent of U.S. renters say owning a home is one of their chief goals, according to the survey. PSB, on behalf of Habitat for Humanity, surveyed 1,000 people in the U.S. and Canada to gauge their perceptions of, and challenges to, affordable housing.

Ninety-one percent of American homeowners credited owning a home with making them more responsible, and 44 percent said it helped them build a nest egg. Forty-one percent say homeownership has given them stability.

But homeownership remains out of reach for many. Nine out of 10 Americans and Canadians say it’s important to find solutions to the lack of affordable housing. At 59 percent, concerns regarding U.S. affordability in particular easily topped other housing issues like safety (16%) and quality (11%).

One major barrier to homeownership cited among survey respondents: the high cost of rent. Eighty-four percent of survey respondents said the high cost of rent was preventing them from buying, followed by 75 percent who said obtaining a mortgage was proving to be a big barrier.

Many of the survey respondents said they’ve struggled to pay housing costs at some point in their life. Among U.S. respondents, 27 percent of respondents said they struggled to pay housing costs in their 20s; 22 percent in their 30s; 11 percent in their 40s; and 9 percent in their 50s.

Source: “Nine Out of 10 Americans and Canadians Call for Affordable Housing Solutions,” Habitat for Humanity (June 20, 2017)

© Copyright 2017 INFORMATION INC., Bethesda, MD (301) 215-4688

U.S. consumer confidence rose a bit in June

 NEW YORK – June 27, 2017 – The Conference Board Consumer Confidence Index increased moderately in June after dropping a bit in May. Overall, consumers have a rosier picture of their situation today, but they’re a bit less optimistic about the future.

The Index now stands at 118.9, up from 117.6 in May. The Present Situation Index increased from 140.6 to 146.3, while the Expectations Index that gauges attitudes about the short-term future declined from 102.3 last month to 100.6.

“Consumer confidence increased moderately in June following a small decline in May,” says Lynn Franco, Director of Economic Indicators at The Conference Board.

“Consumers’ assessment of current conditions improved to a nearly 16-year high (July 2001, 151.3),” Franco adds. “Expectations for the short-term have eased somewhat but are still upbeat. Overall, consumers anticipate the economy will continue expanding in the months ahead, but they do not foresee the pace of growth accelerating.”

Present Situation Index
Consumers’ appraisal of current conditions improved in June. Those saying business conditions are “good” increased from 29.8 percent to 30.8 percent, while those saying business conditions are “bad” declined from 13.9 percent to 12.7 percent.

Consumers’ assessment of the labor market was also more positive. Those stating jobs are “plentiful” rose from 30.0 percent to 32.8 percent, while those claiming jobs are “hard to get” decreased slightly from 18.3 percent to 18.0 percent.

Expectations Index
Consumers, however, were less optimistic about the short-term outlook in June. The percentage of consumers expecting business conditions to improve over the next six months decreased from 21.5 percent to 20.4 percent, however, those expecting business conditions to worsen also declined marginally – from 10.3 percent to 9.9 percent.

Consumers’ outlook for the labor market remained mixed. The proportion expecting more jobs in the months ahead increased from 18.6 percent to 19.3 percent, but those anticipating fewer jobs increased from 12.1 percent to 14.6 percent.

The percentage of consumers expecting an improvement in their income rose from 19.1 percent to 22.2 percent, but the proportion expecting a decline increased slightly from 8.7 percent to 9.2 percent.

The monthly Consumer Confidence Survey, based on a probability-design random sample, is conducted for The Conference Board by Nielsen, a global provider of information and analytics. The cutoff date for the preliminary results was June 15.

© 2017 Florida Realtors

Related Topics: Economic indicators